Champlain Canal Locks

Champlain Canal Home Albany to Troy Waterford to Schuylerville Fort Edward to Whitehall HistoryPhotos Locks
Lower view of Lock 7.
Lower view of Lock 7.

The locks along the modern Champlain Canal have tamed the mighty Hudson River from Troy to Fort Edward, and allow boats to move from the Hudson Valley watershed to the Champlain Valley watershed. There are 11 locks, numbered 1-9 and 11-12. There is no lock 10 as it was deemed unnecessary and never built. Rather than renumber the locks and blue prints (hand drawn 100 years ago!), the engineers decided to skip it.

Locks 1-6, along with the Troy Federal Lock move boats up the Hudson River. These seven locks, and associated dams, spillways and hydroelectric plants are massive and quite different from the other Champlain Canal locks. Locks 7-12 are quite different. These locks are located on an artificial cut and improved river. These locks are quite relaxing, with small spillways and park like settings. This diversity is one of the great qualities of the Champlain Canal.

The Champlain Canal locks accommodate boats that are up to 300 feet long, 43.5 feet wide and have a 12' Draft. The maximum height above the waterline is 17 feet, which means most recreational cruisers can travel the Champlain Canal.

Lock # Location Distance to Next Lock North Distance to Next Lock South Lockmaster Phone #
Lock C1 Waterford 4 5 mi. to Troy Federal Lock (518) 237-8566
Lock C2 Mechanicville 3 4 (518) 664-4961
Lock C3 Mechanicville 2 3 (518) 664-5171
Lock C4 Stillwater 14 2 (518) 664-5261
Lock C5 Schuylerville 4 14 (518) 695-3919
Lock C6 Fort Miller 7 4 (518) 595-3751
Lock C7 Fort Edward 2 7 (518) 747-4614
Lock C8 Fort Edward 6 2 (518) 747-5520
Lock C9 Smith's Basin 9 6 (518) 747-6021
Lock C11 Comstock 7 9 (518) 639-8964
Lock C12 Whitehall 1 (Lake Champlain) 7 (518) 499-1700

Note: No Lock C10.

Crocker's Reef Guard Gate and Dam

While not a lock, this is the only guard gate on the Champlain Canal. This guard gate is located just north of Lock C6 in the artificial section of canal that bypasses Crocker's Reef. This stretch of canal runs parallel to the former Champlain Canal which can be seen on the opposite side of route 4 near here.

The guard gate protects this section of the canal during times when the Hudson River floods, during the winter months, and also aids in maintenance on Lock C6 below. Crocker's Reef Guard Gate is located directly adjacent to the Crocker's Reef dam.

The Crocker's Reef Dam was one of, if not the, first structure built on the modern Barge Canal. It was part of Contract Number 1, the first on the entire canal system. It built between June 5, 1906 and November 22, 1906, is in two parts around an island. It is responsible for navigable water up to Fort Edward, and the beginning of the land-line stretch of canal to Whitehall.

Just north of the dam is where the artificial section of the canal and the river join again. At this point a 524 foot pier was constructed to help boats navigate into the channel without being swept down stream. This pier was built around timber cribs starting on June 24, 1907. These cribs were completed August 9, and sunk into position on August 21. The contractor then started to load the pockets with stone. This crib forms the foundation for the today's concrete breakwater.

Construction of the Crocker's Reef Dam on the Hudson River (1907).
Construction of the Crocker's Reef Dam on the Hudson River (1907).  
A partially built section on the dam (1907).
A partially built section on the dam (1907).  
The newly finished eastern dam in 1907.
The newly finished eastern dam in 1907.  
The newly finished western dam in 1907.
The newly finished western dam in 1907.  
Construction of wooden cribs on the breakwater north of Crocker's Reef dam (1907).
Construction of wooden cribs on the breakwater north of Crocker's Reef dam (1907).  
Wooden cribs that form the foundation for the breakwater north of Crocker's Reef dam (1907).
Wooden cribs that form the foundation for the breakwater north of Crocker's Reef dam (1907).  
Trestle upon the wooden cribs during construction (1907).
Trestle upon the wooden cribs during construction (1907).  
The breakwater pier is cemented and nearly complete (1907).
The breakwater pier is cemented and nearly complete (1907).  


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